Vanishing

You could die before you finish reading this. I could die while you’re reading it. Today. At any moment.

On the average day, we live caught up in ourselves. On the average day, we don’t consider God very much. On the average day, we forget that our life truly is a vapor.

Do you truly believe you could vanish at any minute? That maybe today, you will die? Or do you instead feel somehow invincible?

By now you’ve probably understood that you have a distinct choice to make: just let life happen, which is tantamount to serving God whatever you have left over at the end of the day, or actively run toward Christ.

Do you see that it’s impossible to please God in any way other than wholehearted surrender? Do you grasp the beauty and mysterious joy of walking in genuine intimacy with God, our holy Father and Friend? Do you want to understand God more than you desire security?

How would your life change if you actually thought of each person you came into contact with as Christ—the person driving painfully slow in front of you, the checker at the grocery store who looks more interested in chatting than ringing up your items, the member of your family with whom you can’t seem to have a conversation and not get annoyed?

In Matthew 25 Jesus blesses some people for what they have done. Confused, they ask, “Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you ill or in prison and go to visit you?”

His answer is staggering: “The King will reply, ‘I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.’” Jesus is saying that we show tangible love for God in how we care for the poor and those who are suffering. He expects us to care for the poor and the desperate as if they were Christ Himself.

Do you care for the people you interact with on a daily basis as though they were Christ? Do you look out for the “least of these” to your own detriment? How can you start to rewire your heart and brain in order to see these opportunities to share Christ’s love?

When I am exhausted by my problems—stressed out about my life, my family, and my job—I actually convey the belief that I think the circumstances are more important than God’s command to always rejoice. In other words, that I have a “right” to disobey God because of the magnitude of my responsibilities.

I see myself always learning these lessons often. Even though I glimpse God’s holiness, I still forget that life is all about God and not about me at all.

How often do you think about how fleeting your own life is? How does this realization help you live more transparently, lovingly, trustingly?

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